Fatal accidents fall for HGVs

Fatal accidents fall for HGVs

Positive news for the haulage industry comes from new DfT data showing that fewer trucks were involved in fatal accidents in 2014 than in 2013 with 265 such accidents last year compared to 270 in 2013.

There was also a reduction in accidents causing serious or fatal injuries with 1,247 such incidents in 2014 compared to 1,277 in 2013, although these figures are against the trend of total road deaths, which have risen. The DfT confirms an increase of 4% in reported road deaths of all types in Great Britain in 2014, compared to 2013.

The reduction in accidents involving HGVs is very welcome news and is a credit to the effort of drivers and operators to improve road safety. Even we still need to do better and the RHA will be supporting members and the industry in that.

Regrettably more light goods vehicles and vans were involved in both fatal and serious accidents in 2014 compared to 2013, with the figure rising from 153 to 169 for fatal incidents, and from 1,704 to 1,910 for fatal and serious incidents.

Add a comment

HSE respond to vehicle rollaway incidents

HSE respond to vehicle rollaway incidents

A year after Labyrinth Logistics Consulting covered the subject in depth at one of their Safety Circle meetings, the HSE have now published a study relating to the problems of “rollaways” whilst coupling/uncoupling articulated vehicles.

 RR1069 Establishing direct and contributory factors to the uncontrolled movement of Heavy Goods Vehicles (HGVs) during coupling and uncoupling

A number of fatal or major vehicle incidents are reported to the Health and Safety Executive and local authorities every year where heavy good vehicle drivers have been injured during the coupling and/or uncoupling of the tractor and the trailer unit. When coupling and uncoupling the trailer to and from the tractor unit, the parking brakes on both units should be applied to ensure that neither unit is able to move in an uncontrolled manner. Unintended movement is known as a vehicle runaway.

The study explored the factors that contribute to vehicle runaways using a multi-method approach, which included:

  1. conducting a literature search,
  2. reviewing relevant incidents reported under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations,
  3. carrying out an online consultation survey of trade association members, and
  4. conducting interviews with drivers, supervisors and manufacturers.

Failure to apply the cab handbrake and/or trailer parking brake was identified as the primary reason contributing to vehicle runaways. A combination of individual, job and organisational factors were identified as affecting drivers’ behaviours, and particularly the extent to which the cab handbrake and/or trailer parking brake would be applied. Provision of easily accessible controls, physical solutions (e.g. interlocks, cab alarms), supervision and raising risk awareness were control measures identified that could help prevent vehicle runaways.

Full report here.

Add a comment

Recycling firm incurs £200,000 fine plus costs

Recycling firm incurs £200,000 fine plus costs

HSE have publicised the following court case involving a well known recycling firm;

Recycling firm Sita UK has been fined £200,000 with £11,998 costs after a worker was struck by a moving vehicle, leaving him unlikely to return to work in the near future.
On 13 October Preston Crown Court was told that an employee was hit by a 7.5 tonne telehandler at a waste transfer site in Darwen, Lancashire.
While walking across an outside plastics hand sorting area, the unnamed employee passed behind a stationary telehandler. However, the vehicle began to reverse while he was still in the vicinity and knocked him to the ground.


He was run over by the rear wheels of the vehicle, and remained in hospital for other two months while recovering from his injuries.
The Health and Safety Executive (HSE), prosecuting, told the court that Sita UK, which has now been rebranded Suez, had failed to put in place suitable measures to stop pedestrians being hit by moving vehicles, despite having identified the risks.

The company, of Grenfell Road, Maidenhead, Berkshire, pleaded guilty to beaching the Health and Safety at Work Act.

HSE inspector Stuart Kitchingman said: “Employers need to look carefully at their workplaces regularly to make sure that pedestrian routes are clearly marked and physically separated from vehicle routes wherever possible.

“The employee could have easily been killed and still has severe mobility problems as a result of the accident. He is unlikely to be able to work in the near future.”

Add a comment
TOP